DID YOU KNOW.....31
     
 

 

 

Football has a million and one stories and just as many facts and figures. Here are a few of them - the record-breaking, unusual and bizarre.

More Did You Knows...  
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32

   
   

Photos of Players, Managers and Fans 
through the ages

The latest Front Page Pictures are on the Home Page - but here are the ground pictures from previous weeks.
Other photo pages - Football groundsteam groups.

Tom Finney addressing the crowd at Deepdale after playing his last match for Preston – against Luton Town on 30th April 1960. Looks a bit precarious doesn’t it – I think that there would be a few health and safety issues if he gave a speech standing on that table today!

Finney was born in 1922 and left school at 14 to join the family plumbing business – his later nickname was the ‘Preston Plumber’. His footballing career was delayed by the Second World with his League debut coming on August 31st 1946 when it took him just 18 minutes to score for Preston in the 3-2 victory over Leeds at Deepdale. By the time he made his final League appearance in 1960 he had played in 473 league and cup matches, scoring 210 goals. Every one of those appearances was for Preston although he did come out of retirement at the age of 41 in 1963 to play for Distillery of Belfast against Eusebio’s Benfica in a European Cup tie. Just a month after making his League debut Tom Finney played his first match for England, scoring in England’s 7-2 victory away to Northern Ireland. He went on to play 76 times for England and his 30 England goals was a record at the time.

He was the first player to win the Footballer of the Year award twice and many still regard him as the best player England has produced. Yet he later estimated how much he had earned from football during his entire career – less than £15,000. He became Sir Tom in 1998 and died in 2014 aged 91.

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Now that's what I call a bus trip! Fans on their way to the first Wembley FA Cup final between Bolton and West Ham in 1923.

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Tony Harding heading Barnet's second goal in their 2-0 FA Amateur Cup Semi-Final replay victory over Walthamstow Avenue in 1959. The match was played at what looks like a full White Hart Lane with the drawn semi having been played at Arsenal's Highbury ground - but Barnet were beaten by Crook Town at Wembley in the final.

The FA Amateur Cup had been the only nationwide non-league cup competition from 1893 to the 1969-70 season (some of the Wembley finals had 100,000 attendances) when the FA Trophy was introduced for the professional non-leaguers. With the ending of the amateur status in football the last Amateur Cup final was played in 1973/74 with the FA Vase being introduced the following season with the stronger non-league sides entering the Trophy and the smaller clubs the Vase.

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World Cup winner Gordon Banks at his best saving a header from Hull City's Terry Neil when playing for Stoke City in an FA Cup quarter final tie in 1971. But was the ball over the line before he hooked the ball clear was the talk of the time! Stoke won the match 3-2 at Hull's former home at Boothferry Park. The crowd was 41,452 with gate receipts of £22,229 meaning an average admission price of a little over 50p - those were the days!

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An unusual football partnership but an amazingly successful one.
Elton John took over the club he supported, Watford, in 1976 and the following year employed Graham Taylor as manager. Taylor had spent five years as Lincoln manager after a playing career with Grimsby and Lincoln and had turned down the managers'
job at First Division WBA to take over at Watford - then in the Fourth Division. But by
the 1982/83 they were in the top flight finishing second to Liverpool and a year later were beaten FA Cup finalists. Taylor left for Aston Villa in 1987 but although he had three years as boss of England and another spell at Vicarage Road it was probably that first spell at Watford that saw his best achievement in football.

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Now what were those Port Vale fans thinking of the match being played
on that long gone day?

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Evidence of a torture chamber at Highbury! No, this is not a picture of a bloke in a
bubble-bath but of Arsenal player Wilf Copping in an ice bath in 1934. It's painful just looking at it, and he doesn't look too chuffed about it either! Quite what his injury
was that needed that sort of treatment is unknown but under manager
Herbert Chapman the Gunners were the top club in the country at the time and were innovators of many things that are normal practice now. Thankfully not this one though.

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Don't they look young!
A 14-year-old David Beckham signs schoolboy forms for Manchester United 1989 and starts the relationship with Alex Ferguson that was to last until Beckham left to join Real Madrid in 2003. Sir Alex retired as manager at Old Trafford ten years after that.

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Mascots aren't a new invention - Amos helped Second Division Barnsley get to their first FA Cup Final in 1910. It is believed that Amos was the jockey and not the donkey. But you can't imagine any modern groundsman letting a donkey anywhere near a pitch nowadays. And I wonder how many of the people in the picture would have anticipated being looked at over a century later on this inter-web thing!

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West Ham captain Bobby Moore celebrating at Wembley following the Hammers
FA Cup final victory over Second Division Preston in 1964. I'm not quite sure if the hammer he is pictured with would get through the turnstiles at the London Stadium this season!

It was the first time that West Ham had won the FA Cup and was the first of three successful Wembley cup final wins for the England captain in three seasons. A year
later West Ham were back at Wembley for the European Cup Winners Cup against
TSV Munich while in 1966 it was that World Cup final victory over West Germany.
Great times.

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Kevin Keegan and family, a PR picture from the 1970s which was meant to show that footballers were just like the rest of us. It had to be said though that you probably
needed to be a football superstar if you were going to be able to afford the weekly shampoo bill that must have put a strain even on the Keegan finances!

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The venue? Well the church in the background is a give away. Pele in action in one of the two matches he played in England - both at Everton's Goodison Park - during the 1966 World Cup finals. He scored a goal in the pictured match - against Bulgaria - to become the first player to score goals in 3 World Cup finals. But with the reputation of being the best player in the world came some harsh treatment from opposition defenders. He missed Brazil's second match because of injury but returned for the third only to suffer the same treatment. Pele - and Brazil - were literally kicked out of the 1966 World Cup, failing to reach the knock-out stages after having won it in 1958 and 1962.
Link - Everton

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I bet all three of them were dreaming of scoring the winning goal at the
FA Cup Final at Wembley - yep, in those days, the FA Cup was important
enough to want to win!

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England's third place in the 2015 World Cup is a far cry from the beginnings of organised women's football in this country. That was back in the First World War
when the women who worked in the munitions factories in the north played
organised football to improve morale.
The top team of the time was the
Dick, Kerrs ladies side from Preston. They attracted an attendance of over 10,000
for a Christmas Day match at Preston's Deepdale ground in 1917 while on Boxing Day 1920 over 53,000 were present at Goodison Park for a friendly against
St Helens Ladies. Earlier in 1920 they had played against a French side in what is considered to be the first unofficial women's international fixture. Dressed in a
tea-cosy hat and the Newcastle United style kit the traditional Dick, Kerrs pre-match greeting was a kiss rather than a hand-shake - and by the looks of that picture
that kiss appeared to be a bit more passionate than a peck on the cheek!

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England had the Charltons and the Nevilles but on 20th April 1955 Wales became the
first of the Home countries to play two sets of brothers in an international team.

John and Mel Charles, Ivor and Len Allchurch were in their side for the 3-2 victory over
Northern Ireland at Windsor Park, Belfast. John Charles scored a hat-trick.

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I was at a reserve team match a while ago (football isn't all about the
Premier League you know!) and there was a woman there with a rattle. There was a
time when that was one of the few things they sold at football grounds (a rosette, club badge and programme being the others)...but not now. I wondered if she had turned
up at a first team match with a rattle would it be confiscated as a dangerous weapon?

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Well if that was a goal celebration it certainly didn't catch on! Liverpool's Ray Clemence
didn't look too happy with the situation at a West Ham v Liverpool match at
Upton Park in 1972.

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